Mulberry Lily Medium Grey

After school Clarke got a place at NCAD (the National College of Art and Design in Dublin) where he specialised in fabric print and fashion design followed by Cordwainers, in London, then the only school in the world where students could learn the craft of shoe making. “The Shoe School was half shoes half saddles,” he tells me. “It was the only place where you could learn to pad and cut.

She had our attention now but what was she doing? Emerson Collective did not appear to conform to traditional models of philanthropy. Its worldview seemed more or less clear center left politics with a dash of techie libertarianism but its grand plan was unstated while its methods of spurring social change implied that simply funding good works is no longer enough. The engine Powell Jobs had designed was equal parts think tank, foundation, venture capital fund, media baron, arts patron and activist hive.

Winsford soprano Charlotte Hoather scoops prize at EisteddfodA new singing star is born11:00, 8 JUL 2018Updated12:40, 8 JUL 2018Winner Charlotte Hoather from Winsford in Cheshire She was presented with the brand new Pendine Trophy, a solid silver salver, and a cheque for by Mario Kreft MBE, proprietor of the arts loving sponsor, the Pendine Park care organisation.Charlotte clinched the title just ahead of Wrexham soprano Rachel Marsh, 25, and tenor Mark Christian Bautista, 26, of Calamba, in the Philippines who were each presented cheques as runners up.The international competition attracted a record number of 43 hopefuls try to impress judges at a preliminary competition, with the three finalists making it onto the main Llangollen pavilion stage for contest.Mr Kreft and his wife, Gill, pledged to contribute to the International Voice of the Future competition through their Pendine Arts and Community Trust (PACT) which supports cultural and community initiatives, with a further coming from the Sir Bryn Terfel Foundation and from the Eisteddfod.Still pinching herself in disbelief, a thrilled Charlotte Hoather said she would be using the prize money to further her career.She said: “I just want to sing opera; it’s all I’ve ever wanted to do. My dad went to school in Wales and my granddad had a B in Llandudno so we used to visit Llangollen quite a lot.”I entered the same competition as few years ago at Llangollen and came third, that was in 2012. But the prize money now is amazing and will help me pay for more lessons and to go to auditions in other countries.”It’s life changing and gives me the security I needed.”It’s about building a career now and I need to produce some videos to send out through the Young Artist programme to international opera companies.”Charlotte studied for two years at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester before moving to the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland where she completed her undergraduate studies and has now just finished a master’s degree at London’s Royal; College of Music.Winner Charlotte Hoather from Winsford in Cheshire with the award along with Pendine’s Mario Kreft, Musician in residence at Caernarfon’s Pendine residential care home Nia Davies Williams, Tony Hayes who donated the trophy, President of the Eisteddfod Terry Waite, Sarah Edwards Aritst in residence at Pendine, Runner up Rachel Marsh and Pendine’s Gill KreftShe said: “The preliminary competition was tough and the standard was incredibly high.”I have made real friends with Rachel and Mark.”The atmosphere has been lovely and to win has just been amazing.”Teacher Rachel Marsh, from Minera, Wrexham, wasn’t too disappointed at not taking the top prize as it was her first solo competition.She said: “I have been singing in choirs as long as I can remember and then began solo lessons with Anne Williams King of North Wales Opera.”I studied linguistics at the University of Manchester and then did a primary school teaching course..

Leave a Reply